Person

Dr. rer. pol., Universitätsprofessorin

Almut Balleer

Prof. Dr. Almut Balleer
Lehr- und Forschungsgebiet Empirische Wirtschaftsforschung

Address

Building: Sammelbau

Room: R532

Templergraben 64

52062 Aachen

Contact

workPhone
Phone: +49 241 80 96154
Fax: +49 241 80 92337

Office Hours

By appointment
Registration required via email
 

Profile

Almut Balleer, born in 1979, has been a professor of Empirical Economic Research in the School of Business and Economics at RWTH Aachen University since September 2012. She gained her doctoral degree from the University of Bonn, also visiting the Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona on a Marie Curie research grant from the European Doctoral Program. In 2009, she became assistant professor at the Institute for International Economic Studies (IIES) at Stockholm University and has been research affiliate since 2015. Besides, she is a research professor at ifo Institut München since 2013 and in 2016, she became research affiliate at the Center for Economic Policy Research (CEPR).

Her research fields are macroeconomics, applied research in econometrics and labor economics. Amongst other things in her research she has examined the role of the technological progress and human resources for economic fluctuations in working hours, employment and unemployment.

New projects address to the evaluation of the economic stabilisation's policy, in particular for short-time work, as well as the effect of financial market frictions on price and employment adjustments of firms.

CV

Research Interests

Macroeconomics
Applied econometrics
Labor economics

Selected Publications

  • Balleer, A., Gehrke, B., Lechthaler, W., Merkl, C. (2016). Does Short-Time Work save Jobs? A Business Cycle Analysis. European Economic Review, 84, pp. 99-122.
  • Balleer, A., Gomez-Salvador, R., Turunen, J. (2014). Labour Force Participation in euro area countries: A Cohort Based Analysis. Empirical Economics, 46(4), 1385-1415.
  • Balleer, A., van Rens, T. (2012). Skill-Biased Technological Change and the business cycle. Review of Economics and Statistics, 95(4), 1222-1237.
  • Balleer, A. (2012). New Evidence, Old Puzzles: Technology Shocks and Labor Market Fluctuations. Quantitative Economics, 3(3), November, 363-392.